And then there were four.

_MG_0695_2

I’m heartbroken this morning. A fox got one of our ducks in the night.  Whilst we constantly worry about losing lambs to foxes, we feel pretty secure about the fowl as they are locked away each night in a high walled ‘fort’ almost impossible for a fox to breach.  But this morning I found one of our beautiful Pekins headless in the garden, still warm.  The latch on a little side gate to the run, which we never use, must have been loosened over time by the wind and had blown open, so Brer Fox had easy access to a pen full of geese and ducks.  Incredibly the four remaining ducks and all the geese were unharmed, though highly stressed.   Luckily I had let Sam out earlier than usual this morning so he must have frightened the fox before anymore damage was done. We’ve had our five Pekin ducks for years and they move about the garden and ponds as a unit, travelling everywhere together in a comical little regiment.  So it’s particularly distressing to lose a member of this tight knit group.  But that is life on the farm.  It’s all of us against the blasted foxes.  As I walked back from feeding everyone and cleaning up after the kill, I saw the culprit in the distance – as bold as brass.  But even though my father taught me how to handle a gun, I couldn’t bring myself to shoot anything.  Not even a fox.

_MG_0683_2

_MG_0699_2

IMG_0796_2

IMG_0799

On a brighter note, we had 2 more lambs born yesterday, strong and robust and already playing together in the paddock. I’m hoping our little pack of donkeys will help keep them safe from the foxes.

IMG_0770_2

IMG_0767

_MG_0702

_MG_0703

IMG_0717

IMG_0722_2

IMG_0726

IMG_0728

IMG_0731

Above: This is Nigel.  His leg was broken in a fight, years ago when he was a lamb and though he’s quite lame, he manages to get around the paddock perfectly well so has been kept as a pet.  He loves lambing time and every Spring is very protective of everyone,  like an old uncle.  This morning he was greeting one of our new arrivals.

IMG_0735

Baby Phoebe peering over the Ha Ha and hoping for a little snack. We built the Ha Ha years ago so there would be no fence to ruin the view.  It’s a wonderful thing as at certain angles it appears that the animals are actually in the garden.  It’s too high to jump so they are separated from the gardens by a barrier, invisible from the house.

IMG_0738

IMG_0758

Peas in a pod.  Phoebe and mother Clementine.

IMG_0774

IMG_0776_2

Seeing the dams this low is worrying.  We are desperate for some good rains.

IMG_0783

IMG_0788

Calling for mother.

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

3 comments

  1. Once again, glorious photos. Ah, the fox…always clever.We have lost so many ducks and chooks over the years.I had to shout at one once, which was on the back of our rooster, to get him to dismount, and then he (or she) had the front to casually pick up another hen he had killed earlier, before disappearing in the bush.(This was 1 o’clock in the afternoon)

  2. It was lovely to see all your beautiful farm photos, and to be able to show Samson and Marianne. I will talk to you soon Maureen. Fondest love, Susan

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s