The Potting Shed

The Talented Mr Vinks.

I’m pleased this morning to be able to talk about a new range at The Potting Shed – a collection of garden and conservatory  furniture and sculpture by local Southern Highlands artist, Joe Vinks.  These pieces are truly stunning works of art – expertly crafted from fallen timbers, predominantly gum, and embellished with gum and casuarina nuts. They are rustic, elegant and witty. Most of Joe’s commissions are for international clients these days – since a major ski lodge installation for a high profile Australian in Aspen launched him in America, his work is now in demand around the globe. So naturally we are pretty excited  to be able to show several of his works.  Below a beautiful console table, a round occasional table and decorative sculpture, a two seater garden bench, the ‘Outback’ chair, the Bushman’s chair and two versions of his plant ‘wraps’.  These bottomless pots are not only strikingly lovely – they are a very clever design enabling you to move large potted plants, from place to place with ease.   Joe will make gates and all other items to your exact dimensions so if you have a particular need, please let us know.  In the meantime, do come in to The Potting Shed and view this gorgeous and very Australian collection by the talented Mr Vinks.

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Italian beauty.

IMG_0261We are thrilled to be offering the spectacular Italian range of AK47 firepits and accessories at The Potting Shed.  Sleek, elegant design combined with tough, durable finishes elevate these fire pits from utilitarian to art installation. We absolutely love them and visitors to The Potting Shed have been drawn to them … as if they are magnetic.

In researching these products, I was romanced by the poetic descriptions of the Italian design team. Like the fire pits themselves, each ‘mission statement’ is perfectly, thoughtfully crafted. I feel their words help us to understand these lovely, artistic pieces. Come in and see for yourself.

Of the Ercole (above), the hero of the play,  the AK47 studio team say this:  “Strong and statuesque, you cope with bad weather like a mythological hero. You are made of concrete that surrounds a primitive fire.You know how to be elegant and informal, your materials age and are transformed with the passing of time, giving you a more and more authentic flavour. Your generous dimensions mean that you are always the centre of attention. Your common sense can be seen in the way you organise your precious wood.”  AK47IMG_0270ercole_2

 

Below:  Tripee – “You can be seen from afar, reminiscent of nomadic encampments. Within your slender and essential structure you show signs of ancient communication means.” AK47IMG_0258

 

 

 

 

IMG_0271Discolo (below):  “Curious and dynamic, rather mischievous, it doesn’t like to stay still: it dives into the sand, among the rocks, hides in its enclosure or rises up to be completed… A perfect combination of simplicity and efficiency.” AK47discolo_1a

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Zero (below):  “An outdoor wood fireplace, a nest in which to seek refuge, enjoying the warmth of the fire: the eccentric dance of the flames is replaced by the silent burning of the embers.  A sweet warmth that comforts your guests.”AK47zero19

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Mangiafuoco (below): “Small yet great, you can dominate the daring flames that leap upwards, darting and dancing, moving continuously. You can tame them and contain them in your compact shape, a theatre where the natural performance of fire is enacted.”AK47IMG_0257

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The Berlin (below): “Even a crumbling wall can guide the imagination of an artist… Strong iron can be dominated, subdued and modelled. The hard material is enhanced and imposes its qualities with all its strength.”AK47berlin_1b berlin_sde

 

Coming soon!   The Truck:  “It can hold a great load, but it is brilliant and easy to handle. It is agile and moves on command, and immediately returns motionless. They say it can even climb the stairs, it would seem a conjuring trick, but it isn’t a trick, it’s just skill.”AK47

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Local delivery and installation are included in the prices of the major pieces. Call us on 0419 154 860 if you would like to discuss an order.

A Sparkly Day

IMG_0106Yesterday, Easter Sunday, was a sublimely beautiful day.  Dreamy.  The Potting Shed was filled with families, dogs and children, lovers and friends out walking in the autumn sunshine. Music filled the air and everyone was relaxed and travelling slowly through the day.  Sunshine bounced off every surface as it does at this time of year when the light drops lower and the angle of reflection is intensified.  The day sparkled on the droplets of water caught in the leaves of the Lady’s Mantle, on the reflections in the birdbath and on the wonderful glass beads adorning one visitor, Karen Black,  as she approached The Potting Shed counter.  Where did you get those lovely beads I asked, and may I take a photo.  At the Burrawang Markets she explained as her amused husband announced I was the fourth person that day to ask to photograph her. They were made by local artist Louisa Rose & Co. and they are now on display at The Milk Factory Gallery in Bowral.  It’s amazing what a bit of sparkle and a splash of colour does to catch the eye but I suspect it was this lady’s gorgeous personality as much as those beads that made her stand out in the busy crowd yesterday.

The Milk Factory Gallery and Exhibition Space/art & design centre/cafe is at
33 Station Street (rear), Bowral NSW 2576 if you would like to see more of Louisa Rose’s work.  Happy Easter from The Potting Shed. 
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Meet my new neighbour

Good morning from The Potting Shed.

It was a gorgeous day at work yesterday … after drenching rains, sunshine at last! The lovely autumn light bounced softly off the usually severe urban surfaces that surround us and sauntered elegantly into the new shop next door … the studio of the super clever Suzie Anderson. So I couldn’t resist catching a few photos to share with you. IMG_9891 IMG_9889 IMG_9884 IMG_9880 IMG_9876 IMG_9874 IMG_9871 IMG_9868 IMG_9866 IMG_9864 IMG_9862 IMG_9861 IMG_9859

 

I could just move right into this beautiful space and snuggle up on one of the linen covered,  down filled sofas and read gardening books for the rest of the year! Infused with love and style,  every nook and cranny has Suzie’s expert signature stamped all over it.  Antique chandeliers, lamps, urns and curiosities from France, Belgium, Sweden, America and other places afar,  blend with contemporary homewares, jewellery and art. And floating above and in and around each lovely, carefully selected piece, the aroma of expensive candles and gentle notes of exotic music add that other intangible quality … that sense of immersion, of being transported into another world. Do yourself a favour, come in and experience this special space for yourself.

The rest of the marmalade story!

IMG_0598Yesterday I started to tell you about marmalade but in my haste, I accidentally hit publish before I had finished my story! Then the day flashed by and I had no time to return to it. As I was saying, the damper with marmalade from the new cafe in the Dirty Janes Antique Market, where we are located, is delicious. The marmalade, made by Cath, one of the owners,  was a beautiful, translucent mandarin colour and was tangy and delicious.  I love a good marmalade but it is surprisingly difficult to get one with enough bite.  They’re all too sweet. I’ve hunted high and low and have tried all the usual famous brands, I’ve pounced on home made jars at school fetes, trawled through the Farmers Markets here and in Sydney, scouted through shops in English villages where they should know all about marmalade …  and still I hunger for just the right combo of chunkiness, tartness and aroma.  So I turned to Stephanie Alexander’s Cook’s Companion for help.  There on page 473 she lists this lovely entry:

Seville marmalade from a competent western-district cook.

This recipe came to me from a woman who read of my failure with my first-ever Seville marmalade.  She reminded me that it is most important to use fresh fruit – straight from the tree is ideal. 

Seville oranges, water, salt, sugar.

Thinly slice fruit, having first removed all pips and central membrane.  For every 500g prepared fruit, allow 1.8 litres water and 1/4 teaspoon salt.  Simmer fruit, salt and water until peel is soft and easily squashed.  Allow to rest for 24 hours in a ceramic or stainless steel bowl.  Next day, measure fruit and water into a preserving pan or large stockpot using a cup.  Bring to a boil and for every cup of fruit and water allow an equal measure of sugar.  Return to a boil and cook for 25-30 minutes until setting or jelly stage.  Bottle into hot, sterilised jars.

Reading this tip about ‘straight from the tree is ideal’, brings me to another citrus note. We have just received a lovely delivery of very healthy, vigorous, perky looking orange, lemon, cumquat, grapefruit, blood orange and lime trees.  So if you too are a marmalade lover, you might like to think about putting in your own citrus grove and in a year or two you’ll have enough for your first batch of home-grown, home-made marmalade!

Visit The Potting Shed website for location and contact details.